LEED® Projects

HISD CROCKETT ELEMENTARY
HISD DUCHAUMES ELEMENTARY
HISD PINEY POINT ELEMENTARY
ELLINGTON FIELD FIRE STATION
RICE UNIVERSITY RECREATION & WELLNESS CENTER
ROYAL NORWEGIAN CONSULATE BUILDING
CITY OF WEST UNIVERSITY RECREATION CENTER

HISD LEROY CUNNINGHAM ELEMENTARY
HISD BELLAIRE HIGH SCHOOL
HISD ALMEDA ELEMENTARY
AWTY INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL
SAN JACINTO COLLEGE STUDENT CENTER
DPISD SAN JACINTO ELEMENTARY

 

LEED® Credit Information

MRc1.2 “Building Reuse—Maintain Interior
Nonstructural Elements”

Points may be awarded be re-using a portion of existing non-structural elements, including floors. Terrazzo floors typically last the life of the structure. As such, in many renovation projects, the original terrazzo flooring can be restored to its original luster following some inexpensive repairs and refinishing. The ability to preserve the floor intact rather than replacing it will cut costs and contribute towards this LEED® credit.

MRc2 “Construction Waste Management”
Points may be awarded by recycling or salvaging nonhazardous construction and demolition debris. In projects that require demolition of an existing structure with terrazzo flooring, terrazzo components may be salvaged for reuse or recycled. A qualified terrazzo contractor can assist with component recovery. If terrazzo flooring is to be used in the new construction, the salvaged aggregate can even potentially be used in the new flooring.

MRc4 “Recycled Content”
Points may be awarded for using materials with recycled content. Terrazzo allows for easy incorporation of recycled glass, as well as stone or marble that has been salvaged from other buildings and re-crushed and sieved for use in terrazzo. A floor incorporating 100 percent recycled glass aggregate could contain as much as 75 percent recycled raw material by volume. Aluminum strips may also contain recycled metal.

MRc5 “Regional Materials”
Points may be awarded if a portion of the project building materials are extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured within a 500-mile radius of the project. The calculation is

based on the cost of raw materials. Marble chips, glass aggregate, as well as cement and epoxy binders are available throughout many areas of the United States. Terrazzo can contribute to points if raw material suppliers are located within 500 miles of the project site.

IEQc4.1 “Low Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants”
Points may be awarded if the terrazzo installation does not include adhesives and sealants that contain Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in excess of certain limits. Cement based terrazzo systems use inorganic binders that contain no VOCs. The manufacturers of thin set epoxy terrazzo systems have moved to 100 percent solid formulas, eliminating the addition of any VOCs in the material. Certification of compliance may be obtained from the individual epoxy manufacturer.

IEQc4.3 “Low-Emitting Materials – Flooring Systems”
Points may be awarded if terrazzo sealers do not contain VOCs in excess of certain limits. Sealers used in finishing terrazzo will generally comply. For schools, flooring elements must meet testing and product requirements of the California Department of Health Services Standard Practice for the Testing of Volatile Organic Emissions from Various Sources Using Small-Scale Environmental Chambers, including 2004 Addenda. Generally, epoxy terrazzo products will comply.

IDc1 “Innovation in Design”
Additional points may be awarded under the Innovation inDesign category for innovative performance in categories not specifically addressed by LEED or for achieving exemplary performance in an established LEED credit.

Source: The National Terrazzo and Mosaic Association

 

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